Get Involved

Last year, over 500,000 young people participated in Global Dignity Day events in the Middle East, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. Join us this year on October 18th.

Learn More

We’ve created a variety of curriculum ideas, resources, and a Tool Kit to help you organize small group Dignity Workshops and learning experiences in classrooms, community and youth groups, under tents in refugee camps – anytime and anywhere.

Teaching Tools

We work in over 70 countries around the world. If you’d like to find the Global Dignity Chapter in your country, please select the button below.m.

Find Your Country

There are so many things you can do right now to lead a life that is based on the values and principles of dignity.

Take The Pledge

Global Dignity began in one classroom with 30 students in 2006. Be part of the growing movement for dignity and volunteer in your country.

Volunteer

Every nonprofit organization is only as strong as its base and network of support. We would so appreciate your support of our efforts at any level.

Donate

Our Mission

To unite everyone with the belief that we all deserve to live a life of dignity.

From 30 students in a single classroom in 2006 to

480,000 young people in 74 countries in 2016

We invite you to read on to learn more about Global Dignity - our founders, our leadership, and how our growing community of dignity-centered leaders have started a ground-up movement to heal their communities and transform our world.

What We Believe

What Is Dignity

Dignity is a feeling in your core.
A belief in your own worth.
A belief in the worth of others.
With dignity, we lead lives of hope and optimism and compassion,
Guided by a universal ethical compass.

Dignity is the belief that our basic humanity
Is shared with every other person on this planet.

Our Call To Action

A life of dignity means you are as valuable and important,
worthy and wanted, as any other human being.
It means, fundamentally, that you matter.

And when you believe you matter, then you know
That your voice matters,
Your relationships matter,
And your actions matter.

You have the confidence to act.

You know you will make a positive impact,
That you will work with others
To transform your community -- and the world,
Into one where understanding, compassion and love triumph.
You become a changemaker,
Or what we call a dignity-centered leader.

October 17, 2017 Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Global Dignity Day 2017: A message from Co-Founder John Hope Bryant

A message from Co-Founder John Hope Bryant about what dignity is and a call to join us in celebrating Global Dignity Day.

October 17, 2017 Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Global Dignity Day 2017: A message from Co-Founder John Hope Bryant

A message from Co-Founder John Hope Bryant about what dignity is and a call to join us in celebrating Global Dignity Day.

Our History

In 2006, three Young Global Leaders began a conversation at the World Economic Forum about how polarized the world felt.

So much divides us. Politics. Religion. Race. Borders. These divisions fuel hatred, conflict, war, intolerance and injustice. But everyone, everywhere, has the yearning to be understood, to be valued and recognized, to be able to fulfill their dreams and potential in life. This is universal and true for each one of us.

And if you understand this for yourself, you will want this for others too.

This is what we call dignity. It is the foundation of our shared humanity. As Bishop Desmond Tutu says, the African concept of Ubuntu expresses this perfectly. I am you and you are me. What we want for ourselves, we should want for others.

John Hope Bryant, CEO and Founder of Operation HOPE, based in the United States, Pekka Himanen, author, professor and advisor to the former Finnish President, and Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, met for the first time at the World Economic Forum in 2006 and felt compelled to do something that would spread the values and principles behind this powerful concept of “dignity.”

“We grew up in such vastly different communities and circumstances. Finland and Norway, and the notorious neighborhood of Compton in Los Angeles. As we looked back at our youth, each of us wished that we had been given access to this powerful ethical compass much earlier in life.” Pekka Himanen

During the World Economic Forum gathering, they wrote the Founding Principles for a new nonprofit organization, Global Dignity. Muhammad Ali was the first person to sign on. Next, they found a school down the mountain in Switzerland and led the first immersive, storytelling-based workshop on dignity in just one classroom. Bishop Tutu left the Forum to join them in the school, and when Sir Richard Branson and musician Peter Gabriel saw Bishop Tutu leaving the conference, they joined too.

And that is the story of how Global Dignity was founded. From that one classroom of students in 2006, we now work in over 70 countries. In 2016, over 480,000 young people and civil society leaders, volunteer facilitators, parents and teachers were engaged with Global Dignity workshops, forums and assemblies.

The First Decade

For 10 years Global Dignity has been working to instill a deeper understanding of the values behind the meaning of dignity and to support dignity-centered leaders active in their communities around the world.

2006

Global Dignity started in just one school, with 30 students in Davos, Switzerland, during the World Economic Forum. Our first Honorary Board Members, Richard Branson, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Andrew Young joined, and Muhammad Ali and others signed the “Dignity Principles.” Peter Gabriel sang to students and teachers during the Dignity workshop, beginning our effort to engage artists.

Global Dignity started in just one school, with 30 students in Davos, Switzerland, during the World Economic Forum. Our first Honorary Board Members, Richard Branson, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Andrew Young joined, and Muhammad Ali and others signed the “Dignity Principles.” Peter Gabriel sang to students and teachers during the Dignity workshop, beginning our effort to engage artists.

2008

Global Dignity Day was created, and we expanded to over thirty countries, reach- ing over 6,000 young people.

Global Dignity Day was created, and we expanded to over thirty countries, reach- ing over 6,000 young people.

2011

The first Global Dignity Forum was organized in Finland with over 1,000 participants. Amartya Sen and President Martti Ahtisaari joined the Honorary Board. Dave Stewart (the Eurythmics) wrote the “Dignity Song” performed live on stage by Nadirah X, continuing our efforts to engage artists, musicians and creativity in everything we do.

The first Global Dignity Forum was organized in Finland with over 1,000 participants. Amartya Sen and President Martti Ahtisaari joined the Honorary Board. Dave Stewart (the Eurythmics) wrote the “Dignity Song” performed live on stage by Nadirah X, continuing our efforts to engage artists, musicians and creativity in everything we do.

2014

Global Dignity recruited 46 Country Chairs and five NGO’s as Partner Organizations, reaching over 300,000 young people in 2014. Local chapters expanded their work into schools and communities beyond Global Dignity Day, including in refugee camps and communities working with young people incarcerated in prison.

Global Dignity recruited 46 Country Chairs and five NGO’s as Partner Organizations, reaching over 300,000 young people in 2014. Local chapters expanded their work into schools and communities beyond Global Dignity Day, including in refugee camps and communities working with young people incarcerated in prison.

2015

Global Dignity received its first major grant of $300,000 from the Angelica Fuentes Foundation.

Global Dignity received its first major grant of $300,000 from the Angelica Fuentes Foundation.

2016

Global Dignity Day is celebrated in 70 + countries around the world, reaching over 480,000 young people. Many Countries and Partner Organizations expand the Workshops and Learning Experiences year round and begin conversations about “scale” and impact with education leaders and networks of schools.

Global Dignity Day is celebrated in 70 + countries around the world, reaching over 480,000 young people. Many Countries and Partner Organizations expand the Workshops and Learning Experiences year round and begin conversations about “scale” and impact with education leaders and networks of schools.

2017

Global Dignity expands the founding Board and hires its first Executive Director, opening its home office in New York City.

Global Dignity expands the founding Board and hires its first Executive Director, opening its home office in New York City.

Dignity Principles

Our work is guided by a simple set of principles, that every person:

1

Has the right to pursue their purpose and meaning in life, and to reach their full potential.

2

Deserves to live in societies that provide humane access to education, health, income and security.

3

Has their life, identity and beliefs respected by others.

4

Has the responsibility to create the conditions for others to fulfill their potential, acting to strengthen the dignity of others, building a foundation of freedom, justice and peace for this, and future generations.

5

Believes that dignity in action means standing up against injustice, intolerance and inequality.

October 21, 2011 Helsinki, Finland

Nadirah X performs Dignity Song live in Finland at Global Dignity Day celebration

Global Dignity Day was organized for the first time in Finland on 19th October, 2011. The event included speeches of HRH Crown Prince of Norway Haakon, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, founder, chairman and CEO of Operation HOPE, John Hope Bryant, President and Nobel laureate Martti Ahtisaari and host, founding member of Global Dignity, philosopher Pekka Himanen.

October 21, 2011 Helsinki, Finland

Nadirah X performs Dignity Song live in Finland at Global Dignity Day celebration

Global Dignity Day was organized for the first time in Finland on 19th October, 2011. The event included speeches of HRH Crown Prince of Norway Haakon, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, founder, chairman and CEO of Operation HOPE, John Hope Bryant, President and Nobel laureate Martti Ahtisaari and host, founding member of Global Dignity, philosopher Pekka Himanen.